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The Coastline Paradox PROVES You Are Infinite and One with the Universe

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The Coastline Paradox refers to the infinite boundary of a coastline when examined at increasing magnification or with reducing units of measurement.

 

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But it equally applies to the boundary of any seemingly distinct and separate object, including your own body.

 

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Just another basic fact with astonishingly positive implications that they don't teach kids in school and that scientists pretend doesn't exist.

 

 

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A ridiculous gibberish 5 min video that just demonstrates the authors stupidity ..... 

 

Anyone with any common sense would know the coastline cannot be infinite !!! 

 

Discrepancies in figures are down to how accurately it is Measured ...longer figures are more accurate and just take account of the small  twists and turn , but there is a limit and it will never reach anywhere approaching infinity ....

 

It comes down to defining what is "coast line" .... it's the boundary of the sea with the land .... imagine you are standing on a sea shore , and just follow the line with a tape measure .

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25 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

It comes down to defining what is "coast line" .... it's the boundary of the sea with the land .... imagine you are standing on a sea shore , and just follow the line with a tape measure .

 

That's the point.

 

If you run a tape measure along a seashore, you're bridging and skipping over all the small crags and crevices and only getting a crude approximation of the boundary between two objects (land and sea, or your body and the rest of the universe) based on the degree of detail you're prepared to include.

 

A simplified example is below, with the top edge of the 'W' representing a coastline or the boundary of your own body:

 

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I'm more accurately defining the ACTUAL boundary that separates the two objects with my red tape measure, right?

 

And then, if you look more closely at any area of the diagonal boundary I've measured (but you haven't), you can see it is made up of smaller crags and crevices which would also need to be measured in the same way to try to define the ACTUAL boundary:

 

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It's fractal geometry that extends to infinity, meaning there is no boundary that defines you from the rest of the universe.

 

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Though you don't need 'bigness' to understand or confirm this infinite connection to everything else, the below comparison between neural networks in the brain and galaxy clusters indicates that the same fractal principle of indivisible wholeness applies outwardly too.

 

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1 hour ago, size of light said:

 

That's the point.

 

If you run a tape measure along a seashore, you're bridging and skipping over all the small crags and crevices and only getting a crude approximation of the boundary between two objects ....land and sea,

 

 Well sure , no scientist would deny that .... then you get down to the atoms themselves , but even then it would not be infinity ....

 

A purely mathematical fractal would have infinite boundary ...although I'm not sure , I would have to ask a maths forum ...

 

But this is all very silly and twisting  what is commonly meant by the term coastline  ...

 

They don't teach it in school because it's Silly!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, oz93666 said:

Well sure , no scientist would deny that ....

 

They deny it in their refusal to extrapolate and communicate the implications of it on our sense of body separation from the external world.

 

Quote

then you get down to the atoms themselves , but even then it would not be infinity ....

 

A purely mathematical fractal would have infinite boundary ...

 

It goes deeper than atoms - there's a vast subatomic world which contains more space than the outer observable universe.

 

And just like the outer observable universe, the only inner limit is where our current observational capabilities end.

 

Science has no problem accepting that the universe extends far beyond what we can see of it, and there is no reason at all to infer that it doesn't also extend inwardly beyond the planck scale.

 

Interestingly, humans (or actually all life on Earth) are positioned at almost the exact midpoint in terms of size between the largest and smallest things we can measure, which clearly indicates that these limitations are only the limitations of our range of vision and have nothing at all to do with the actual dimensions of inner and outer space.

 

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But this is all very silly and twisting  what is commonly meant by the term coastline  ...

 

They don't teach it in school because it's Silly!

 

There's nothing silly about it at all.

 

They call it the 'coastline' paradox not because there is anything special about coastlines - it's just a simple example they use to demonstrate the principle.

 

It applies to any object with a seemingly defined boundary, including and - most importantly - our own bodies.

Edited by size of light
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On 7/12/2019 at 11:37 AM, size of light said:

They call it the 'coastline' paradox not because there is anything special about coastlines - it's just a simple example they use to demonstrate the principle.

 

It applies to any object with a seemingly defined boundary, including and - most importantly - our own bodies.

 

Whether it's the island of Britain, your body, or an apple, you can't define the boundary of any object when you examine it.

 

And that applies to your brain, also.

 

So how can your brain be the producer of your consciousness when the illusory object we call 'the brain' dissolves and vanishes when your consciousness looks at it?

Edited by size of light

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This thread has bombed at the box-office, so I'm going to reboot the franchise and start again...

 

Below is the coastline paradox explained at the freaky math blogspot (http://freakymath.blogspot.com/2011/08/coastline-paradox.html )

 

Bolded, enlarged text  is my emphasis, not the author's.

 

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The Coastline Paradox

 
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What is the length of the coastline of Great Britain?

If you'd ask the Ordnance Survey (the mapping authority for the United Kingdom), they might give you a number of 11,073 miles (17,820 km). That's all well and good, but what does this number actually mean?

If I said the coastline had an infinite length, would I be wrong?


To illustrate the problem imagine a huge printed map of Britain, billboard size. On it, you could measure the outline of Britain with a desk ruler (30cm). A quick approximation can be made by moving the whole thing around the perimeter. This way you measure distances of 30cm at a time; sum it all up and you have a rough figure. If you want more precision, use the ruler to measure 1cm at a time instead. This smaller step-size is a lot more work but it would result in a larger end result for sure.

So which figure is correct? I might say more precision is better, but then what is the limit? You could get even more precision by moving down to millimeters. Then nanometers. Then atomic or even subatomic scales. Eventually, any real world possibility of measuring is gone. But you lost any usable number long before that.

Mathematically there is no such physical limit. You could increase the precision forever, and the measured length of the coastline would increase along with it. Like a snowflake that offers more detail every time you look closer.
 
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Now extrapolate this basic mathematical fact and apply it to 'the coastline' (i.e. apparent boundary) of your own brain...

 

 

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"You could increase the precision forever, and the measured boundary of your brain would increase forever along with it."

 

In other words, the measured boundary of your brain does increase forever when you try to define it.

Edited by size of light
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'The Coastline Paradox' could be renamed 'The Subject-Object Illusion' or 'The Illusion of Duality' or 'The Mathematical Proof That You Are Infinite and One With the Universe' and remain a completely accurate and mathematically-faithful description of what is going on here. 

Edited by size of light

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I am watching a TV program where a guy said, "Sussex has over 800 miles of coastline."

 

I suppose he could have said, "Sussex has over 125,000 miles of coastline."

 

If he said that, I'd be down there like a shot!

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On 7/12/2019 at 11:37 AM, size of light said:

 

 

 

 

There's nothing silly about it at all.

 

They call it the 'coastline' paradox not because there is anything special about coastlines - it's just a simple example they use to demonstrate the principle.

 

It applies to any object with a seemingly defined boundary, including and - most importantly - our own bodies.

I find this post very interesting, what you are describing is the fractal nature of reality and how you can have an infinite amount of energy (information) inside a defined boundary. Fractals are a system embedded into a larger system  then a larger etc, all the way up to the infinitely large and down to the infinitely small and any part of that system has all the information to create the whole , the only difference being the order of magnitude or boundary of each embedded system .

For  arguments sake ,if you divided the coast line using miles and then using nano meters ,the the complexity and therefore information gathered using the smaller distance is going to be far greater ,even though the distance hasn't changed,not withstanding tidal and erosion effects,therefore if you use an infinitely small distance,you get an infinite amount of information and the same applies inside the boundary. Just like with pictures ,large pixels less information small pixels more information.

Some might say that you can't go to infinitely small as the Planck distance is the smallest thing the universe dose, but if you take the the speed of light the size of the universe and the Planck distance as simply boundaries of the order of magnitude we all exist, in an infinite fractal system, the skies the limit

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