Jump to content
muir

British Culture

Recommended Posts

In Africa someone who is said to have lost their roots and their sense of self is said to be 'lost'. There are many examples around the world where contact between a native culture and outsiders has seen the destruction of the native culture and their sense of self leading to all kinds of societal ills. Some native peoples absorbed into 'modern' life have seen drug addiction, alcoholism and family breakdown occur in their societies as they lose touch with their old ways of seeing, thinking and being along with their codes for living. Its almost as if the purpose and meaning of before is displaced by a modern existence devoid of either leaving people feeling bereft.

 

Marxist thinkers in the twentieth century sought to completely sweep aside the old traditions to create what they called a 'tabula rasa' or blank slate upon which they could impose their materialist vision for society. Marxist town planners began to bulldose historic centres of european cities and to replace them with uniform, grey, concrete hi-rise towers in a style called 'brutalism' for its stripped back appearance. This destruction of streets and their replacement with stacked boxes saw the break up of communities of neighbours and their replacement with atomised people who turned to television for succour where they were then subjected to tavistock institute programming.

 

In the current battlefield of identity politics it is often forgotten that european people were once the 'natives' and the 'barbarians' that the romans sought to 'civilise'. The native peoples cultures were all shattered and genocided by modernising forces. The romans even pursued an active policy of genocide when marching north of hadrian walls as they were ordered to kill on sight any native peoples they encountered as they marched north presumably to create living space for colonists.

 

While more recent and well publicised genocides were being carried out for example against the native americans in the colonisation of the americas or the relocation of africans during the transatlantic slave trade, the gaels of scotland and ireland were also being driven off their lands and onto boats that were then sent to the new lands. Their children were forbidden in school to speak their native language and their bards were exiled. In england people were press ganged into the navy, deported for minor infractions, indentured for political dissent and driven off the land by the enclosures acts and into the cities in the industrial revolution.

 

But if you swap out a people from a place the place loses its meaning in that there are no folk memories of the events that have occurred there or of the significance of various sites or of the meanings of their names and the graves of their ancestors are forgotten. To newcomers those places then simply become obstacles to move around while the resources of a place can be exploited for profit. Without a deeper connection to place the land is no longer a living thing to be respected but instead a hostile thing to be tamed while any monetary value is extracted from it.

 

My concerns with the ideological dogmas of the modern age are therefore multi-faceted. I am concerned that the breakdown of the sense of self of a people can lead to the breakdown of society itself leading to nihilism and a host of social ills. I am also concerned that without a connection to land people become more mercenary and careless leading to environmental destruction. I am also concerned that if you replace one group of people with another it doesn't just alienate and disconnect the displaced people it also does the same to the newcomers too who now find themselves in a foreign land to which they feel no historic connection, which can breed resentment and frustration.

 

Globalisation is seeing not only the mass movements of people but also the mass movement of goods which further disconnect people from place. Culture is often born out of place and that is the main theme I am going to explore in this thread. The aim of this thread is not to push negative nationalism as I am not claiming that british culture is better than anyone elses. It is more a way to celebrate the culture of these islands as part of a beautiful and diverse world. As the technocrats increasingly push to replace people with machines and as they seek to drive people off the land and into 'urban zones' and as they seek to move people around the world to destroy their sense of self and connection with place and as they try to drive a wedge between people and the land our connection to our culture that is born out of place is going to become increasingly important as the way to avoid the isolation, alienation and sense of being adrift and lost in an increasingly uncaring world that the technocrats would impose on us in their quest for total control over the individual.

 

 

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disconnection

 

It seems to me that the conspiracy appears to be one geared around disconnecting people from anything that sustains them. Modern life seems to disconnect people from having actual face time with other human beings. Cultural subversion disconnects people from their past. The comforts and conveniences increasingly offered in the modern service economy disconnect people from meaning and purpose. Automation disconnects people from old skills and knowledge of how to do things for ourselves. Our sanitary and micro-managed environment removes the opportunity for individuals to problem solve and develop self knowledge through dversity. The globalised movement of foodstuffs around the world disconnect us from a seasonal diet and the rhythms of nature. Mass immigration disconnects people from the connection to place. Calcification of the pineal gland through fluoridation disconnects people from other realms of consciousness. Geoengineering disconnects us from a stable and predictable climate.

 

You could go on and on and the result is an increasing sense of malaise in society which will only deepen as people are replaced by machines and micro-managed in the technocracy

 

We are being systematically robbed of all the most fundamental things that make us human and it is all by design. The goal of the technocracy is not to create equality, it is to create dependency on the system another word for which is 'slavery'.

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a debate once with a marxist who wanted to convince me that britain had no culture of its own! It was amusing to watch as they explained this using the english language which is of course part of the culture of these isles made up as it is of germanic, french and latin all fused together in britain.

 

People around the world use the language and they all adapt it and expand it. Ralph waldo Emerson said the english language 'is the sea which receives tributaries from every region under heaven'. The english oxford dictionary lists over half a million words in the english language with more added every year. To compare german has a vocabulary of over 185,000 and french over 100,000.

 

That person has probably played football at some point or at least watched it and the modern game of football is part of british culture now enjoyed around the world. But not just football, almost any sport you can think of came out of the british isles: golf, boxing (queensberry rules), rugby, cricket, hockey, tennis...you name it

 

I make this point not to be triumphant but to make the point that british culture is so ubiquitous that it is taken for granted by many people who won't even realise that much of what they use and enjoy is actually british culture.

 

We could for example speak about inventions with the tar road, the pneumatic tyre, the steam train, the hypodermic syringe, the telephone all coming from scotland alone.

Edited by muir
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With those provisos out the way I invite people to share what they love about these isles or even areas of culture that you are aware of as an example of the diversity of culture in the british isles

 

I touched upon sport above and the british are clearly sport mad. Arguably other british quirks include unusual hobbies such as bird watching, train spotting, fishing and gardening (including allotments). Surrounded on all sides by sea, fishing is not just a past time in britain but an industry albeit one much reduced by the EU.

 

If you had to sum up the british you would say that they have a love of nature and of animals. I doubt any people anywhere else own as many dogs per capita then the british do.

 

But its not just dogs and cats, the british also love their farm animals and agricultural shows up and down the country are part of a long tradition in the british isles of people driving their livestock to fayres to sell them. No doubt there was much drinking and dancing to celebrate the process.

 

There are still many old drove roads in scotland that cattle were driven along to get to the big markets in crieff or down in england. One of the biggest and oldest fairs was the now discontinued Weyhill fair which occurred three times a year: in April for trading cattle, July for selling the lambs and October for hops. Part of the celebration was the pre-historical ceremony of 'horning the colts' where new shepherds were initiated by wearing a pair of ram horns on their head which supported a cup of ale while they sang:

 

''swift is the hare; cunning is the fox,

Why should not this little calf grow up to be an ox,

To get his own living among the briars and thorns,

And die like his daddy with a great pair of horns!'

 

A similar ceremony was held in at ye Olde wrestlers inn at Highgate in london. More about festivals and fairs in other posts

 

 

 

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The agricultural fairs of britain have seen the rise of livestock breeds that have become famous the world over such as the clydesdale horse, aberdeen angus cows and the ayrshire dairy cow

 

Some of the most famous horse races in the world are in britain such as ascot and the grand national as well as dog racing.

 

The british will race anything. They'll race cars, they'll race rowing boats and they'll even chase after cheese rolled down a hill

 

th?id=OIP.jvBsYHIhGSrkhRt22qOyVAHaEo%26p

 

The Cooper's Hill Cheese-Rolling and Wake is an annual event held on the Spring Bank Holiday at Cooper's Hill, near Gloucester in England.[1] It was traditionally held by and for the people who live in the local village of Brockworth, Gloucestershire, but now people from all over the world take part. The Guardian newspaper called it a "world-famous event", with winners from the United States, Australia, New Zealand and Nepal.[2]

The event is traditional and takes its name from the steep hill on which it occurs. Until recent years, it was managed in a quasi-official manner by nominated locals, but since 2010 the event has taken place spontaneously without any management

 

This ceremony originally took place each Whit Monday, before it later transferred to the Spring Bank Holiday. Two possible origins have been proposed for the ceremony. The first is said that it evolved from a requirement for maintaining grazing rights on the common.[5]

The second proposal is pagan origins for the custom of rolling objects down the hill. It is thought that bundles of burning brushwood were rolled down the hill to represent the birth of the New Year after winter. Connected with this belief is the traditional scattering of buns, biscuits and sweets at the top of the hill by the Master of Ceremonies.[6] This is said to be a fertility rite to encourage the fruits of harvest.[5]

The first written evidence of cheese rolling is found from a message written to the Gloucester town crier in 1826, though even then it was apparent the event was an old tradition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper's_Hill_Cheese-Rolling_and_Wake#Multiple_winners

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Music...where the heck do you start?

 

Some of the biggest bands of pop and rock have been out of britain but they all come out of much older traditions.

 

The BBC have a good radio show 'travelling folk' hosted by Bruce MacGregor of blazing fiddles: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00tlyrt

 

A good podcast that gives a good taster of british folk music is 'folk on foot': https://folkonfoot.podbean.com/

 

Welcome to Ceolas, the home of celtic music on the internet, since 1994. Ceolas houses the largest online collection of information on celtic music, and has links to hundreds of related sites. Due to pressures of work, Ceolas is currently being partially maintained, but not futher developed much, until more time becomes available. Please excuse the dust! We've just started (Nov 2003) to serve ads from Google. Please support out advertisers - it greatly helps in keeping Ceolas going.

http://ceolas.org/ceolas.html

 

About the TMSA

Since its foundation in 1966, The Traditional Music and Song Association of Scotland has helped to foster and promote Scotland's unique musical traditions.

The TMSA is a membership organisation open to all. Our members include music enthusiasts, festival fans, amateur and professional performers, tutors, academics and entire families.

TMSA Aims & Policies

Mission

To promote, present and preserve the traditional music & song of Scotland.

 

Vision

Our vision is that:

  • Scotland’s vibrant living indigenous heritage of traditional music and song is recognised and valued within and outwith Scotland as an intrinsic part of our national identity
  • there is equal and widespread access to opportunities for people within Scotland to learn, teach, attend and participate in Scottish traditional music and song at a range of levels, thus laying solid foundations for development and innovation whilst at the same time safeguarding the grassroots of our diverse heritage
  • people globally can access information about Scottish traditional music and song, its practitioners past and present, and opportunities to participate in related activities.

 

 

Values

We value:

  • the diversity of Scotland’s indigenous music and song heritage that stems from the cultural, agricultural, industrial and political history of Scotland
  • the inclusiveness of our heritage which unites each community, crosses generations and enables a shared understanding between communities nationally and globally.
  • the grassroots traditions (intrinsically and as a source for new interpretations)
  • the contribution that participants at all levels of ability make to maintaining and developing Scotland’s traditional arts
  • the financial and social contribution that Scottish traditional music and song makes not only to local communities but also nationally and globally.

 

Strategic Aims

  • To ensure that the indigenous traditional music and song of Scotland continues as a vibrant living heritage
  • To gain national and international recognition of Scotland’s traditional music and song as an intrinsic part of our national identity
  • To ensure that information about Scotland’s music and song is globally available

 

Strategic Objectives

1. To enable people to learn, teach, attend and participate in Scottish traditional music and song at all levels of ability in venues within and outwith Scotland by providing:

  • opportunities (mainly within Scotland)
  • information on opportunities provided by other organisations and individuals (mainly within but also outwith Scotland)


2. To work individually and with other organisations to:

  • raise awareness of and inform people globally about Scotland’s traditional music and song
  • commission and conduct research related to our vision
  • support practitioners and organisations working in the field of Scottish traditional music and song


3. To facilitate submission of information concerning practitioners, instruments, playing and singing styles, local and national customs and other relevant facts about Scotland’s traditional music and song. This information will be compiled and organised to create a web-based interactive archive to assist people seeking information


4. To build an accessible collection of Scotland’s traditional music and song to enable people to study, appreciate, learn and perform these tunes and songs.


5. To continue to develop the capacity of the TMSA to enable it to achieve its vision

 

We also have a comprehensive range of organisational policies. If you require details of any of our policies please contact the TMSA National Office.

http://tmsa.org.uk/tmsa-aims-policies.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celtic music festivals held in the british isles include the gaelic Mod, Celtic Connections (in glasgow) and the eisteddfod in wales (see below). The welsh are also famlous for their choirs and brass bands often associated with mining towns.

 

In Welsh culture, an eisteddfod (Welsh: [e(i)ˈstɛðvɔd] ('ay-steth-vod'), plural eisteddfodau Welsh: [e(i)stɛðˈvɔda(ɨ)]) is a Welsh festival of literature, music and performance. The tradition of such a meeting of Welsh artists dates back to at least the 12th century, when a festival of poetry and music was held by Rhys ap Gruffydd of Deheubarth at his court in Cardigan in 1176, but the decline of the bardic tradition made it fall into abeyance. The current format owes much to an 18th-century revival arising out of a number of informal eisteddfodau. The closest English equivalent to eisteddfod is "session"; the word is formed from two Welsh morphemes: eistedd, meaning "sit", and bod, meaning "be".[1] In some countries, the term eisteddfod is used for certain types of performing arts competitions that have nothing to do with Welsh culture.

Other Celtic eisteddfod-like events

There are some Celtic language specific cultural festivals similar to eisteddfodau. In Cornwall, an analogous event is known as "Esethvos Kernow" (Cornish for "Eisteddfod of Cornwall") and is connected with Gorseth Kernow. The Scottish Gaelic Mod and the Breton Kan ar Bobl also have similarities to an eisteddfod.

The eisteddfod idea has been taken up by non-Welsh speakers in the Channel Islands, particularly for the preservation of the local dialects Jèrriais and Guernésiais, and is called such. See Jersey Eisteddfod.

In Ireland, Seachtain na Gaeilge is similar to an eisteddfod; it celebrates Irish music and culture and promotes the use of the Irish language. The "Fleadh" is an annual traditional music festival that takes place in the same town for a few years in a row, then moving on to another area of the country in an effort to include all localities in the celebration.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisteddfod

 

A pan celtic festival is the inter celtic festival in brittany:

 

The Festival Interceltique de Lorient (French), Gouelioù Etrekeltiek An Oriant (Breton) or Inter-Celtic Festival of Lorient in English, is an annual Celtic festival, located in the city of Lorient, Brittany, France. It was founded in 1971 by Polig [fr].

This annual festival takes place in the heart of the city every August and is dedicated to the cultural traditions of the Celtic nations (pays celtes in Brittany), highlighting Celtic music and dance and also including other arts such as painting, photography, theatre, sculpture, traditional artisan as well as sport and gastronomy.

Participants come from Brittany, Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, Wales, Cumbria, the Isle of Man, Cape Breton Island, Galicia, Asturias, Acadia, and the entire Celtic diaspora.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festival_Interceltique_de_Lorient

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its possible that british folk music may have given rise to modern genres like rock and roll music through the fusion of british folk with black gospel music in the  mississipi delta. Some believe that gospel in turn may have been inspired by gaelic psalms sung to this day in churches on the western isles

 

Language is another big area of british culture and the dominance of english has been mentioned which has seen a huge literary heritage dating back centuries but before that Britain had an oral culture with knowledge passed down by word of mouth.

 

Also sharing these isles with english is gaelic in scotland and ireland and welsh with cornish and manx on the isle of man falling into disuse. Talk about DIVERSITY! We got lots of it. As well as languages we have countless regional dialects and accents each with their own words and turns of phrase.

 

Different regions also produced their own styles of music and of dress and their own customs see for example the highland games in the north to compare with say morris dancing in the south.

 

But each region also created its own food and drink often depending on the climate and the soil types with scotland producing whiskey from the peaty water of the north and the west country of england producing cider and now the south of england producing wine.

 

Fruit wines are produced in scotland where world class raspberries and strawberries grow eg cairn o mhor winery and ales are produced all over now with england being the main producer.

 

Regional foods have also developed that have now received recognition for their geographic and cultural place such as arbroath smokies, melton mowbray pies and bakewell or manchester tarts or rhubarb from the 'rhubarb triangle' in yorkshire. Stornoway creates its own type of black pudding as does Bury in the north of england. Loch fyne oysters, north sea cod, cumberland sausages, cornish pasties, lancashire hotpot and many more foodstuffs make particular areas or dishes popular.

 

Customs have developed around some of these foodstuffs such as waisailing the apple trees of somerset or blessing the river nith with whiskey or the eyemouth herring queen coronation as well as modern incarnations such as the golden spurtle porridge making championship or the Feis Ile Islay festival of music and malt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The brits love nothing more than a social gathering. Nowadays its mostly music festivals but there are still village fetes on village greens, galas, fairs, games, ceilidhs, scottish country dancing and festivals of all kinds from book festivals to art festivals to comedy festivals to anything you can think of! Anything you can think of the british have turned it into a festival or a hobby.

 

Famous for their tea drinking, public houses and their self deprecating humour, they love their sunday walks and sunday roasts and talking about the changeable weather of the british isles.

 

They love their history and the country is littered with castles, standing stones and country homes all full of visitors all year round. Each region has different architectural styles depending on the materials available. The yorkshire downs are criss-crossed with their old dry stone walls with different styles of dry stone walling to be found across the country. In wales homes and walls can be found made of slate, in Dorset, Wiltshire, hampshire, sussex, kent, surrey, berkshire, suffolk and norfolk homes can be found made of flint, brick in the industrial heartlands, limestone in bath, red sandstone in perthshire, caithness slab in the north and many more besides.

 

In the southern counties thatched rooves and in the west country where there are clay deposits cob houses can be found. In east lothian the dutch style pantiles brought over as ships ballast by merchants and welsh and scots slate elsewhere. Megalithic structures are found right across the british isles pointing to a past age of organisation of a grand scale.

 

Before all this recent twaddle about 'renewables' britain ran on renewables with wind power, horse power and water power powering all british agriculture and industry for centuries until oil took over.

 

The Horse

Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride,
friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity?
Here where grace is laced with muscle and strength by gentleness confined.

He serves without servility; he has fought without enmity.
There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent;
there is nothing so quick, nothing more patient.

England’s past has been borne on his back.
All our history is in his industry.
We are his heirs;
He is our inheritance.
-Ronald Duncan

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking outwards britain has miles of coastland and its often said that no one is ever more than around 75 miles from the sea in britain which may explain the brits love of the sea side, of fish and chips and of sailing. 

 

Looking inland common sites are the landrover defender, the work horse of the british countryside and the welly-boot the modern day armour against puddles and ticks. ''if it wasnae for your wellies where would you be?''- Billy Connelly

 

Looking upwards there are four public observatories all watching space and all located in scotland

 

Looking downwards we have a long history of mining going back to tin trading with the phoenicians

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, The Apprentice said:

.

 

Hello apprentice!

 

You are just the man to post some info about the history of crafts and craft skils in britain the loss of which led to an attempt at revival:

 

The Arts and Crafts movement was an international trend in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan in the 1920s as the Mingei movement. It stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial.[1][2][3] It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism in the 1930s,[4] and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.[5]

The term was first used by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson at a meeting of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1887,[6] although the principles and style on which it was based had been developing in England for at least 20 years. It was inspired by the ideas of architect Augustus Pugin, writer John Ruskin, and designer William Morris.[7]

The movement developed earliest and most fully in the British Isles[4] and spread across the British Empire and to the rest of Europe and America.[8] It was largely a reaction against the perceived impoverishment of the decorative arts at the time and the conditions in which they were produced

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arts_and_Crafts_movement

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great thread

 

Love it :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, muir said:

 

Hello apprentice!

 

You are just the man to post some info about the history of crafts and craft skils in britain the loss of which led to an attempt at revival:

 

The Arts and Crafts movement was an international trend in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan in the 1920s as the Mingei movement. It stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial.[1][2][3] It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism in the 1930s,[4] and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.[5]

The term was first used by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson at a meeting of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1887,[6] although the principles and style on which it was based had been developing in England for at least 20 years. It was inspired by the ideas of architect Augustus Pugin, writer John Ruskin, and designer William Morris.[7]

The movement developed earliest and most fully in the British Isles[4] and spread across the British Empire and to the rest of Europe and America.[8] It was largely a reaction against the perceived impoverishment of the decorative arts at the time and the conditions in which they were produced

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arts_and_Crafts_movement

 

 

 

Indeed, some of my family members lived and worked only a few miles from Ruskin's place at Coniston, and yes my passion is gaining skills and perfecting them, then sharing them with others, which I have done with students from the four corners of the planet, and my native England and Ireland, with many skin colours.

 

In the song I posted earlier there are a few key words and meanings, one was an ancesteral need, to cherish the things that normalize a nation, this can be done with anyone, and our reslove cannot be stopped if we wish it so.

 

The very worst thing any government can do is thrust different cultures together at break neck speed and expect stability in the short to medium term, this has to be done by the individual/s like I did it, travelling the country seeking for the remaining craftsmen and women so as to retain those skills for the future..

 

 

Edited by The Apprentice
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, MrA said:

What a great thread

 

Love it :)

 

Just a wee reminder that we live in a very cool place and that if we don't want to lose it we need to be very careful because if certain elements get their way we will lose it all

 

Also its about localism v's globalism

 

We need the discussion to move away from identity politics and into areas like the impacts of globalism on things like culture and societal cohesion because these issues affect everyone in the long run

 

What's the point of shipping food over here from across the world when we can enjoy a seasonal diet that keeps us rooted in our land and in the rhythms of nature?

 

The fake-left is harping on about CO2 and it likes to speak a lot about air travel but the biggest gas guzzlers are the container ships that are the driving force behind globalism. Why are we doing this when we have so much good produce so close to home? We are constantly told about how important sea food is for us and yet thanks to the EU most of our seafood goes elsewhere eg spain

 

Brits should be enjoying cheap and readily available seafood. We should have some of the best health in the world and instead we are growing sick on processed foods!

 

Its really about making everyone dependent on the cabal and their global market so that we all lose our self-reliance and become their helpless slaves

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, The Apprentice said:

my passion is gaining skills and perfecting them, then sharing them with others, which I have done with students from the four corners of the planet, and my native England and Ireland, with many skin colours.

 

maybe you can pick out some choice clips from the hands series you've shared from before or something along those lines? Or even some clips of your own

 

perhaps brits love for DIY is an echo of an older age where most people had a skill? many surnames are from the craft skills their ancesters had eg fletcher, cooper, mason etc

 

maybe the british love of dogs and cats is an echo from the times where most people lived on the land?

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, muir said:

 

maybe you can pick out some choice clips from the hands series you've shared from before or something along those lines? Or even some clips of your own

 

One film that fist the bill is,

 

 

 

And another, where the endings words make perfect sense to anyone with half a brain, a brain that must realize to survive we need to keep our hands busy, and not be reliant upon hands that have to work under duress, even when they do not realize what is being done to them.

 

 

We truly are what we create for ourselves, and live or die by the things we make.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thought of another british sport: shinty

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We often hear politicians talk about 'British values' and yet there is never any definition of what those 'values' are.

 

What exactly is it to be British?

 

Yesterday afternoon I escaped from my suburb in Birmingham to visit Earlswood Lakes near Solihull. A very beautiful and picturesque place, in a quite rural area. While having a walk around and enjoying the scenery, it was so pleasant to encounter so many other people doing the same, whether visitors or residents of the area themselves, who were so well-mannered and polite, greeting each other with a friendly 'hello', or the motorists giving a friendly wave as us walkers stepped out the road to let them pass by.

 

It just goes to show that there is some civility out there, and people that are considerate and civil to each other, as opposed to those of us squeezed ever closer together within the cities, who barely make eye contact nor give the time of day.

 

Maybe I am a dying breed, but I felt right at home there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, The Apprentice said:

We truly are what we create for ourselves, and live or die by the things we make.

 

nice! you once posted a cracking clip about a family that made harps as a cottage industry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, muir said:

 

nice! you once posted a cracking clip about a family that made harps as a cottage industry?

 

Here it is, history on going,

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

We often hear politicians talk about 'British values' and yet there is never any definition of what those 'values' are.

 

What exactly is it to be British?

 

Yesterday afternoon I escaped from my suburb in Birmingham to visit Earlswood Lakes near Solihull. A very beautiful and picturesque place, in a quite rural area. While having a walk around and enjoying the scenery, it was so pleasant to encounter so many other people doing the same, whether visitors or residents of the area themselves, who were so well-mannered and polite, greeting each other with a friendly 'hello', or the motorists giving a friendly wave as us walkers stepped out the road to let them pass by.

 

It just goes to show that there is some civility out there, and people that are considerate and civil to each other, as opposed to those of us squeezed ever closer together within the cities, who barely make eye contact nor give the time of day.

 

Maybe I am a dying breed, but I felt right at home there.

 

I know exactly what you mean

 

Consideration and good humour i'd say are british values. Caring is a british value. caring about all kinds of things!

 

I'd give you a 'like' but i've run out of my quota for the day!

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, The Apprentice said:

Here it is, history on going,

 

That's the one! what a corker

 

peat aged wood, craft skills and musical knowledge married to create a master piece

 

Mairi Campbell & Hamish Moore - The Piper and the Maker

 

Edited by muir
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

We often hear politicians talk about 'British values' and yet there is never any definition of what those 'values' are.

 

What exactly is it to be British?

 

Yesterday afternoon I escaped from my suburb in Birmingham to visit Earlswood Lakes near Solihull. A very beautiful and picturesque place, in a quite rural area. While having a walk around and enjoying the scenery, it was so pleasant to encounter so many other people doing the same, whether visitors or residents of the area themselves, who were so well-mannered and polite, greeting each other with a friendly 'hello', or the motorists giving a friendly wave as us walkers stepped out the road to let them pass by.

 

It just goes to show that there is some civility out there, and people that are considerate and civil to each other, as opposed to those of us squeezed ever closer together within the cities, who barely make eye contact nor give the time of day.

 

Maybe I am a dying breed, but I felt right at home there.

 

When the cabal have the majority corralled the culling will be so easy to achieve, the city state will in my humble opinion be like  the highland clearances all over again, but there will be nowhere else left to go, but a soylent end to a short life may become a natural state of being, it is a known fact that any city cannot support itself from within, and within languish the Varroa Destructor feeding like crazy off of the crazed inhabitants..

 

From the Bothy to the street band our culture must remain intact.

 

 

 

Edited by The Apprentice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, The Apprentice said:

When the cabal have the majority corralled the culling will be so easy to achieve, the city state will in my humble opinion be like  the highland clearances all over again, but there will be nowhere else left to go, but a soylent end to a short life may become a natural state of being, it is a known fact tha any city cannot support itself from within, and within languish the Varroa Destructor feeding like crazy off of the crazed inhabitants..

 

I used to think that there was going to be some sort of terrible crisis that would then beckon in the NWO lockdown society such as a war or a breakdown of societal law and order or a bio-attack or a financial crisis and maybe we'll see them all yet but i'm beginning to think that it might all be a lot more mundane than that

 

if there is a crisis then people would have to face upto it and pull together to deal with the crisis so the elite won't want that. If on the other hand they slow kill us for example through driving down health and fertility through microwave exposure, endocrine disrupting chemicals and processed foods while rendering us useless by replacing us with automation then we would simply peter out and slowly vanish with barely a whimper and I'm not sure which frightens me more

 

The internet of things smart grid and the microchipping and the cashless society and the social credit score would allow them to police us and to crush any flare ups of resistance that might occur as we vanish from the pages of history

 

Quote

From the Bothy to the street band our culture must remain intact.

 

yup bothy culture is definately an aspect of british culture along with the right to roam and wild camping in scotland though they are slowly eating away at that right for example with the new camping management zones they are creating

Edited by muir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×