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4 hours ago, Reinold said:

I have tried this a couple of times on this forum but I always get the same sourpuss, humourless, fake-insulted snowflake responses.

 

The British sense of humour is disappearing.

 

maybe you just aren't funny....

 

I don't mean to be harsh but seriously dude....going on a conspiracy forum and telling everyone they are wrong to believe what they believe is about as funny as a kick in the balls

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Made by place...

 

''On one occaision, heading north to research this book, my eye fell on a news story about an unresolved murder; a torso of an african boy had been found in the thames and, after several years of forensic research, they had been able to track down the region of africa from which he had come. They had analysed the build-up of minerals in his bones, accumulated in miniscule quantities from the water he drank and the food he ate. It was powerful material evidence of how we are, literally made by place. This sense of place is not just a product of imagination and memory, it is also physical; the elements of the land, its rocks, earth and water, are measured in our bones. It's hard, perhaps even impossible, to abandon our own geography of memory...

 

...The Koyukon of the north-west Alaska use stories to describe their landscape; 'narration as navigation', as Robert Macfarlane puts it, so that the land is 'filled with networks of paths, names and associations. People know every feature of the landscape in minute detail. The lakes, river bends, hills and creeks are named and imbued with personal and cultural meaning'. Narrative can be anchored to place, and a conversation can be a sequence of place names which serve to tell stories, provide moral guidance and encapsulate a rich repository of meanings. Eavesdrop on a family and such dialogues weave in and out of the conversation; any group of intimates with shared memories uses place to reference them.''

 

-The Plot: A biography of my father's english acre, by Madeleine Bunting

 

 

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25 minutes ago, muir said:

Made by place...

 

''On one occaision, heading north to research this book, my eye fell on a news story about an unresolved murder; a torso of an african boy had been found in the thames and, after several years of forensic research, they had been able to track down the region of africa from which he had come. They had analysed the build-up of minerals in his bones, accumulated in miniscule quantities from the water he drank and the food he ate. It was powerful material evidence of how we are, literally made by place. This sense of place is not just a product of imagination and memory, it is also physical; the elements of the land, its rocks, earth and water, are measured in our bones. It's hard, perhaps even impossible, to abandon our own geography of memory...

 

...The Koyukon of the north-west Alaska use stories to describe their landscape; 'narration as navigation', as Robert Macfarlane puts it, so that the land is 'filled with networks of paths, names and associations. People know every feature of the landscape in minute detail. The lakes, river bends, hills and creeks are named and imbued with personal and cultural meaning'. Narrative can be anchored to place, and a conversation can be a sequence of place names which serve to tell stories, provide moral guidance and encapsulate a rich repository of meanings. Eavesdrop on a family and such dialogues weave in and out of the conversation; any group of intimates with shared memories uses place to reference them.''

 

-The Plot: A biography of my father's english acre, by Madeleine Bunting

 

 

 

Sir James Frazer goes into some of this kind of detail in his book where tribal identity and their sympathectic magic once ans still probably does in "The Golden Bough"

 

For those watching the thread who like to save money, you can read it here, it is a hard read but worth it.

 

https://archive.org/details/goldenboughstudy01fraz/page/n10

 

 

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''Judge the art of a country, judge the fineness of its sensibility, by its pottery: it is a sure touchstone'' - Sir Herbert Read

 

The Staffordshire Potteries is the industrial area encompassing the six towns, Tunstall, Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Fenton and Longton[1] that now make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire, England. North Staffordshire became a centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century,[2] due to the local availability of clay, salt, lead and coal.

Hundreds of companies produced all kinds of pottery, from tablewares and decorative pieces to industrial items. The main pottery types of earthenware, stoneware and porcelain were all made in large quantities, and the Staffordshire industry was a major innovator in developing new varieties of ceramic bodies such as bone china and jasperware, as well as pioneering transfer printing and other glazing and decorating techniques. In general Staffordshire was strongest in the middle and low price ranges, though the finest and most expensive types of wares were also made.[3]

By the late 18th century North Staffordshire was the largest producer of ceramics in Britain, despite significant centres elsewhere. Large export markets took Staffordshire pottery around the world, especially in the 19th century.[4] Production had begun to decline in the late 19th century, as other countries developed their industries, and declined steeply after World War II. Some production continues in the area, but at a fraction of the levels at the peak of the industry.

Potteries active in the 19th century include Spode, Aynsley, Burleigh, Doulton, Dudson, Mintons, Moorcroft, Davenport, Twyford, and Wedgwood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staffordshire_Potteries

 

 

''Highland stoneware does not strive for lifeless uniformity''- David Queensberry

 

Highland Stoneware was formed in 1974, by David Grant, while studying at the Royal College of Art in London.  He is still very actively involved with the Company, and decorates many of the current designs.

With support from his professor, David Queensberry and tutor Grahame Clarke, he set up to manufacture in the North West Highlands of Scotland, in order to make tableware with the quality of studio pottery, but also using semi-industrial techniques.

This meant a return to the rugged landscape where he grew up, opening up opportunities for employment in a very fragile local economy.

At present, 19 people work at our Lochinver pottery, and 5 at Ullapool.

Initially, we made plain tableware, but very soon started to decorate the pots, and it is this individual variety of hand painting that we are now famous for. Our artists are encouraged to innovate and develop designs, and to make each pot different. Each piece is signed by the artist.

For collectors, the book ‘Highland Stoneware’ by Malcolm Haslam, Richard Dennis Publications, provides an interesting history of the Company.

https://www.highlandstoneware.com/information/about-us/

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Crofting...

 

Scottish Crofting Federation

Rooted in our communities

1. Who we are and what we do

1.1 The SCF is the only organisation solely dedicated to campaigning for crofters and fighting for the future of crofting. It is the largest association of small-scale food producers in the UK.

Our mission is to safeguard and promote the rights, livelihoods and culture of crofters and their communities

1.2 The Scottish Government has pledged its commitment to crofting because it believes that crofting makes a significant contribution “to the development of a thriving rural Scotland”

Please see: www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/farmingrural/Rural/crofting-policy

The SCF shares the Government’s goal of “thriving crofting communities” as an integral part of a thriving rural Scotland, while not necessarily agreeing with the means by which Government seek to achieve their goal. The SCF is contributing to this Societal Goal by implementing our mission statement “to safeguard and promote the rights, livelihoods and culture of crofters and their communities”. Our Strategy Framework is a document which sets out and structures how we will achieve that Mission Statement.

1.3 SCF is actively engaged with agencies and government officials at local, national and international levels to affect policy on rural development issues relevant to crofting and small-scale food production. At grass-roots level, through its membership structure of constituted and affiliated Branches and Areas, it can respond authoritively to the many issues affecting crofting and crofting communities.

1.4 SCF is a charitable company and an independent non-governmental organisation. It:

• Works to develop, promote and support crofting livelihoods as a unique social system unified through small-scale food production;
• Represents and safeguards the interests of crofters, their communities, their cultural heritage, their moral and    legislative rights;
• Promotes the agricultural, social and environmental benefits of crofting as intrinsic to the development and    maintenance of local rural economies;
• Raises awareness of crofting through information provision and education;
• Promotes diversity and economic viability within crofting;
• Encourages, through training, crofting enterprise, skills and expertise;
• Is led by its membership in developing position on policy matters and works always using participative    methodology;
• Seeks the development of crofting as an important and valuable way of life.

2. What crofting is and why it is valuable

2.1 Crofting is a unique social system that stems from the Highland clearances, in which small-scale food production and care of the environment plays a unifying role. Although crofting refers to the principle of living on and working a small agricultural holding, crofters usually also have other occupations contributing to their livelihoods and the rural economy (historically crofts were deliberately kept below self-sufficiency by landlords in order to oblige tenants into tied labour). In short crofting is a way-of-life that is intrinsically linked to the land.

2.2 Crofting also plays an important part in shaping the landscape, enhancing the natural environment, the cultural heritage and social economy of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. It sustains marginal and fragile rural populations and encourages the unique bond between people and the land.

2.3 The varied landscape created by individual crofts and the extensive practices in crofting have supported a wide variety of wildlife habitats and assisted in the retention of endangered native wildlife species.

2.4 There are over 17,700 crofts in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and over 12,000 crofting households representing about 30,000 family members. Crofting households represent around 30% of households on the mainland Highlands and up to 65% of households in Shetland, the Western Isles and Skye.

2.5 Crofts form a unique tenure system that goes back over 200 years. Approximately 2000 are owner occupied but the majority remain tenanted. Approximately 25% of the land mass of the Highlands and Islands is under crofting tenure – which comprises over 15% of the land mass of UK.

2.6 Land use in the crofting counties is constrained by climate, soils and topography. Agriculturally, virtually all of the land in the Highlands and Islands is classified as Severely Disadvantaged in terms of Less Favoured Area Directive.

2.7 The existence of crofting today is the result of a hard won fight by previous generations of crofters. It has survived a turbulent past to seize the opportunities of today, to build a secure and confident future.

2.8 Crofting embodies the principles of sustainability, diversification, co-operation, entrepreneurialism and community, where the people share a common vision for the common good. It has a vital role in the agricultural, social, environmental and economic aspects of Scottish rural development and is central to sustaining communities in remote and peripheral areas.

https://www.crofting.org/aboutus

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The relation of people to place...not everyone is chasing the money....many value place and community over money...

Why Some Americans Won't Move, Even For A Higher Salary

Sun, 06/09/2019 - 14:30

Authored by Richard Florida via NextGov.com,

A new study identifies powerful psychological factors that connect people to places, and mean more to them than money...

A significant reason for the decline in mobility is that many of us are highly attached to our towns. Nearly half of those in the survey (47 percent) identify as rooted. The rooted are disproportionately white, older, married, homeowners, and rural. Their reasons for not moving are more psychological than economic: proximity to family and friends, and their involvement in the local community or church.

It turns out that the personal costs of moving—and leaving family members, loved ones, and friends behind—are quite high. According to the study, the average American perceives not moving as worth a sacrifice of more than 100 percent of income. The psychological cost of leaving family and friends alone equates to 30 percent. As the study reads: “The median person in our sample will forego 30 percent of his or her income in order to stay close to family.”

America is not just split between expensive cities of opportunity and “the rest.” Moving is about more than finding a job or a more affordable home; it’s a highly personal decision with deep psychological costs. Nearly half of Americans are rooted in the communities, willing to sacrifice substantial income and opportunity to be around people and places they love. It is of no use to tell them to abandon their community ties when the costs to their well-being are so high. This is a critical, and all too often overlooked, dimension of our geographic divide.

CityLab editorial fellow Claire Tran contributed research and editorial assistance to this article.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-09/why-some-americans-wont-move-even-higher-salary

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image.jpg

 

Let's not forget the three Grand Masters and some of their students of the ancient Lancastrian martial art known as  Ecky-Thump

that sadly have all but disappeared.

 

hats-crowd.jpg

Edited by solowrist

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23 hours ago, solowrist said:

Let's not forget the three Grand Masters and some of their students of the ancient Lancastrian martial art known as  Ecky-Thump

that sadly have all but disappeared.

 

taking the piss could be said to be part of british culture however PC culture threatens the ability of people to make satire so there are some areas we should be serious about...

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12 minutes ago, muir said:

 

taking the piss could be said to be part of british culture however PC culture threatens the ability of people to make satire so there are some areas we should be serious about...

 

I couldn't agree more, muir. My post was meant to show that our ability to laugh at ourselves is also a casualty of our lost Island skills as well.  

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1 minute ago, solowrist said:

I couldn't agree more, muir. My post was meant to show that our ability to laugh at ourselves is also a casualty of our lost Island skills as well.  

 

perhaps we shouldn't laugh ourselves into the dustbin of history?

 

look around the world....who are the winners right now? Are they the ones sitting taking the piss out of themselves or are they taking things seriously?

 

There needs to be a balance. Britain has a habit of moving towards a disaster only for a few sensible voices to rise up in warning that then avert the disaster

 

We need to give ourselves permission to take ourselves seriously or we are going to get sand kicked in our face

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"We need to give ourselves permission to take ourselves seriously or we are going to get sand kicked in our face"

 

Humour is not such a bad defence when buried up to your neck in the sand with the tide coming in fast?

I put on my serious face every election time to elect those that take themselves  seriously in order for them to see the funny side and break into fits of laughter.

Laughing at ourselves in no way detracts from being English, it's just those that have allowed others to laugh at us are the biggest comedians that seem to get the loudest applause.

 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, solowrist said:

"We need to give ourselves permission to take ourselves seriously or we are going to get sand kicked in our face"

 

Humour is not such a bad defence when buried up to your neck in the sand with the tide coming in fast?

I put on my serious face every election time to elect those that take themselves  seriously in order for them to see the funny side and break into fits of laughter.

Laughing at ourselves in no way detracts from being English, it's just those that have allowed others to laugh at us are the biggest comedians that seem to get the loudest applause.

 

If you are in an emergency situation and all you do is crack wise you will not effectively deal with the situation in front of you. There's a time to crack wise and there is a time to focus on the task at hand

 

This thread is about exploring the link between culture and place. It is a warning to all those who push a pro-globalist perception that all things are fluid and that there are no implications for moving vast numbers of people around the globe

 

I'm making the argument that humans have a deep connection to place and that the place itself shapes the culture of the people who live on the land. When people are moved around this then breaks that connection with the land. I believe that there are all kinds of negative effects caused by that process

 

Yes there is room for humour in this thread but it is dealing with some very serious issues facing all of us today

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1 hour ago, solowrist said:

OK.

 

If we think about where the cabal are trying to take humanity we hear clued up people like david who have been looking closely at what cutting edge technology the known cabal personnel and organisations are working on and we can see that they are pushing hard for transhumanism, virtual reality, the cloud, augmented reality and so on

 

So what do the cabal need to move every day common people away from their everyday lives of walks in forests and parks and on the beach or hills etc with their dog(s) and/or loved ones to a new form of society where humans are more integrated with technology and living more and more in a fantasy world of virtual reality and less and less in this world we inhabit now?

 

They need to move us away from nature (of which we are a part) and they need to move us away from the land and away from animals and they need to make our lives increasingly artificial and synthetic and unnatural

 

Its my belief that the cabal are being guided in this process by an unseen form of intelligence, lets call it 'silicon consciousness' which they are channeling through occult ritual. That might be a stretch too far for some people to accept but those people would still have to concede that all the other stuff such as the 'smart' technology and the 'internet of things' and the artificial intelligence and drones and autonomous vehicles (eg driverless cars) etc are all being pushed out and not just by private corporations but also by governments who are funding it and facilitating big tech for example through tax breaks

 

So this process of removing us from nature and from our connection to the land and to place is all part of their wider agenda of dehumanising us to socially engineer us into transhumanism. You could even tie in the increase in autism as part of that process as it may assist in the process of making people more compatible with machine interface.

 

So now when we take all this into consideration we can start to see a whole load of todays big issues like MASS immigration in a new light. We can begin to see that they are all really social engineering on a grand scale being carried out by a cabal with an increasingly clear agenda to displace and disconnect humanity from everything that makes us human

 

This same topic could be described by someone from nigeria in a thread called 'nigerian culture' but i am from britain so this thread is called 'british culture' but really the same process is at work across the globe and i would welcome people starting their own threads about their own cultures to illustrate how the cabal is undermining our connection to the land and to each other and to wider nature. The cabal are not really for 'diversity' they are for standardisation which is a key process for central planners

Edited by muir

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1 hour ago, muir said:

EDIT: oops this was meant to be an edit of the post above but i must have hit the 'quote' button

 

Edited by muir

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On 8/23/2019 at 12:33 PM, solowrist said:

"We need to give ourselves permission to take ourselves seriously or we are going to get sand kicked in our face"

 

Humour is not such a bad defence when buried up to your neck in the sand with the tide coming in fast?

I put on my serious face every election time to elect those that take themselves  seriously in order for them to see the funny side and break into fits of laughter.

Laughing at ourselves in no way detracts from being English, it's just those that have allowed others to laugh at us are the biggest comedians that seem to get the loudest applause.

 

 

 

 

 

https://youtu.be/6zkL91LzCMc

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Four Funerals and a Wedding - A Brief History of the War on Humanity

By Julian Rose

 

Within agricultural communities seasons were still celebrated with rituals. Rituals that reminded those who participated in them that it was the bounty of nature that sustained them – and that it was the elements of rain, sunshine, wind and storm that sculptured the patterns of the land and awoke the cosmic in country peoples' souls. 

This story was imprinted in the lines on the faces of peasant farmers. Here there was still a palpable sense of belonging. A sense that gave 'place' a richness of meaning and well defined character. Villagers fed themselves from the land whose soil they tilled. The land that immediately surrounded the village; the old strip-farming way. The emphasis was not on ownership, but on a sharing. The village remained, for a long time, a civilised place. 

But one day a new edict came down from on high, that the medieval system of strip-farming was 'inefficient' and those who worked the land and provided the sustenance necessary for their families were not 'educated' enough to manage the land sustainability. Slowly but surely the village farmers were forced off their land and their long standing connection with their communities was broken. These edicts first came into being in England and then slowly spread across Europe. 

They were known as 'the enclosures', a name which describes the development of a field by field rotational system of agriculture that was supposed to benefit the land, but chiefly benefited the yeoman farmers who took possession of the original strip-farmed land so as to practice this new manner of food production. No longer just for the family, village and community, but for sale 'for profit' in town and city market places.

The impact of this forced exit of peasant farmers from the land and their replacement with profit seeking yeoman farmers, marks the second great funeral to afflict the Western World and later all post industrial nations and civilisations of the planet. What we today call 'globalisation' and the super/hypermarket domination of the food chain, has direct origins in this cruel eviction of peasant farmers from the source of their self sufficiency. Mankind suffered its second great severing of  connection with nature and with the fruits of its labour.

The third great funeral was called 'The Industrial Revolution'. It followed hard on the heels of the enclosures. Once again it was the small island of England that was the first off the line. 

One cannot overstate the impact of the shift of emphasis that The Industrial Revolution brought with it. From the grounded, season inspired life of the working countryside to the abstract nervous energy fuelled life of the hungry, restless city – the contrast was brutal and the sheer scale and decisiveness of this shift is what marks it out as a third great funeral. A funeral of the psychic, physical and spiritual well-being of much of that element of mankind that had somehow survived the first and second great funerals, at the hands of a an authoritarian dogma preaching priesthood and at the command of greedy land grabbers. 

The fever of the machine age was like nothing else ever experienced. While the crafts of the field and forest had evolved steadily over centuries, the machine age arrived with a bang – and with it the almost wholesale forced abdication of the independence and self sufficiency which were part and parcel of a life on the land – as tough as it was at times to uphold.

The peasantry, already hard hit by the enclosures and struggling on on greatly reduced acreages, were offered 'compensation'  and charity by none other than the church; the very church whose monotheistic authoritarianism had contributed to the first great funeral centuries before. Now a great swathe of countryside artisans and craftsmen were wrenched away from their rural homes to become the fundamental manpower behind the manning of the fossil fuel furnaces that would grow industrial England.

It was a revolution built on smoke, fumes and human sweat, and came at a high price to health and peace of mind. Down the airless pits, in tunnels barely high enough to stand up in, colliers hacked away at the coal face; while in the great steel mills above, thousands of tons of the resulting dark carbon nuggets burned hot and fierce to produce dense steel bars that would underpin the new infrastructures, transport systems and mass produced military armaments that ultimately marked Britain as the dominant power of the World.

Virtually all material utilities that we take for granted today, had their roots in the big, dirty and brutal industrial revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries. A funeral whose extended cremation of subtle beauty, sensitivity and sensuality of nature marked a seismic shift in the psychological stability of society as a whole. Nature became displaced as the foundation of human well being, inspiration and earthed spirituality; replaced by a hard edged drive for productivity, efficiency and hegemonic dominance, both in the market and in geopolitical empire building.

The authors, poets and landscape painters who emerged to counter the cruel incisions industrialisation perpetrated on the natural environment, offered a reminder of what had been lost that touched the psyche of all those still able to feel and respond to the deeper seams of a life under constant threat of extinction. The poet William Blake wrote of this time “Improvement makes straight roads; but crooked roads without improvement are the roads of genius.” It was precisely that undulating road of genius that was flattened and straightened out by the industrial revolution's obsession with efficiency and material progress.

An obsession that continues to dominate mankind to this day, with a post industrial Western World still aggressively repeating the pattern by pushing its never satisfied hegemonic ambitions on countries whose own simple working people then become the focus of rabid exploitation, in the sweat shops producing 'cheap goods' for the bargain hunters of Western Super stores.
read full piece here https://www.davidicke.com/article/553102/four-funerals-wedding-brief-history-war-humanity

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Post relocated from the 'common ground thread':

 

I want to expand on a concept i have touched on in my 'british culture' thread which is this idea that as our home the earth is a diverse place it creates a diversity of culture as the people in different areas adapt to the place they are in. For example in the middle east they might wear a turban to keep the heat of the sun off while in russia they might wear a fur hat on their head to keep them warm! Two iconic cultural pieces of dress born out of place

 

Yes that's a trivial example but it helps to illustrate the point

 

In our current climate of what you call 'the culture war' people have become hyper-sensitive so they might see a title like 'british culture' with a wary eye but the point about the concept that culture is born largely out of place is that that kind of culture is essentially PRACTICAL because it has grown out of what works in that place and even if a persons ancestors do not come from that place it doesn't mean that they themselves can't adopt the culture that works in that place

 

So for example why would we have certain items that only grow in new zealand shipped over by container ships which guzzle far more fuel than commercial flights do when we could have a more practical seasonal diet that grows out of the place we are in? Those seasonal foods then shape the cuisine of that place and become part of the 'culture'

 

So this concept i'm speaking about is not hitched to ethno-nationalism. It is simply an appeal that people get back to a connection with the land that they are stood on so that they can live harmoniously with the rhythms of nature and can then more ably step outside of the globalised corporate network of cabal controlled trade

 

This is in fact one way the cabal control 'third world' countries by bribing or threatening their leaders to end the countries self-sufficency by instead creating one or two 'cash crops' which they are then reliant on the corporate cabal to market for them on the global markets. They are then totally vulnerable to fluctuations in the market value of their product as they need a sufficient return on their harvest in order to then have the currency required to purchase all the other goods they need that they now no longer produce themselves!

 

This produces a state of DEPENDENCY. So what i'm interested in is how people around the world can end dependency on the corporate network at individual, community and national level

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10 minutes ago, muir said:

Post relocated from the 'common ground thread':

 

I want to expand on a concept i have touched on in my 'british culture' thread which is this idea that as our home the earth is a diverse place it creates a diversity of culture as the people in different areas adapt to the place they are in. For example in the middle east they might wear a turban to keep the heat of the sun off while in russia they might wear a fur hat on their head to keep them warm! Two iconic cultural pieces of dress born out of place

 

Yes that's a trivial example but it helps to illustrate the point

 

In our current climate of what you call 'the culture war' people have become hyper-sensitive so they might see a title like 'british culture' with a wary eye but the point about the concept that culture is born largely out of place is that that kind of culture is essentially PRACTICAL because it has grown out of what works in that place and even if a persons ancestors do not come from that place it doesn't mean that they themselves can't adopt the culture that works in that place

 

So for example why would we have certain items that only grow in new zealand shipped over by container ships which guzzle far more fuel than commercial flights do when we could have a more practical seasonal diet that grows out of the place we are in? Those seasonal foods then shape the cuisine of that place and become part of the 'culture'

 

So this concept i'm speaking about is not hitched to ethno-nationalism. It is simply an appeal that people get back to a connection with the land that they are stood on so that they can live harmoniously with the rhythms of nature and can then more ably step outside of the globalised corporate network of cabal controlled trade

 

This is in fact one way the cabal control 'third world' countries by bribing or threatening their leaders to end the countries self-sufficency by instead creating one or two 'cash crops' which they are then reliant on the corporate cabal to market for them on the global markets. They are then totally vulnerable to fluctuations in the market value of their product as they need a sufficient return on their harvest in order to then have the currency required to purchase all the other goods they need that they now no longer produce themselves!

 

This produces a state of DEPENDENCY. So what i'm interested in is how people around the world can end dependency on the corporate network at individual, community and national level

 

How about being Amish like with lots of real life skills and a computer to do the more mundane work like record keeping and sharing ideas, this is what I am trying to do whilst learning anything brand new, and it is great fun too.

People are always on the travel but never really getting anywhere or doing anything constructive, they are stuck in their consumerist world walking around malls looking for the cheapest yoghurt or latest outdoor clothing, wasting their energy and their money like shelling peas, what is it about these idiots, they could be doing far more practical and creatinve things instead, and the ones who are members of our allotment work all the hours to keep up with the Jones's and are as miserable as sin.

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14 minutes ago, The Apprentice said:

How about being Amish like with lots of real life skills and a computer to do the more mundane work like record keeping and sharing ideas, this is what I am trying to do whilst learning anything brand new, and it is great fun too.

People are always on the travel but never really getting anywhere or doing anything constructive, they are stuck in their consumerist world walking around malls looking for the cheapest yoghurt or latest outdoor clothing, wasting their energy and their money like shelling peas, what is it about these idiots, they could be doing far more practical and creatinve things instead, and the ones who are members of our allotment work all the hours to keep up with the Jones's and are as miserable as sin.

 

i was driving along today and the farmer had obviously been spreading muck on the fields as there was a bit of an odour in the air. I overtook a car and noticed that the woman driving it had lifted up her scarf and was holding it over her mouth and nose to block out the country smells

 

she was behaving like the smell was some sort of toxic gas! I thought: 'Its not going to hurt you lady!'

 

There are a lot of precious people around these days who are afraid of dirt

 

 

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On 7/14/2019 at 4:45 PM, muir said:

I had a debate once with a marxist who wanted to convince me that britain had no culture of its own! It was amusing to watch as they explained this using the english language which is of course part of the culture of these isles made up as it is of germanic, french and latin all fused together in britain.

 

People around the world use the language and they all adapt it and expand it. Ralph waldo Emerson said the english language 'is the sea which receives tributaries from every region under heaven'. The english oxford dictionary lists over half a million words in the english language with more added every year. To compare german has a vocabulary of over 185,000 and french over 100,000.

 

That person has probably played football at some point or at least watched it and the modern game of football is part of british culture now enjoyed around the world. But not just football, almost any sport you can think of came out of the british isles: golf, boxing (queensberry rules), rugby, cricket, hockey, tennis...you name it

 

I make this point not to be triumphant but to make the point that british culture is so ubiquitous that it is taken for granted by many people who won't even realise that much of what they use and enjoy is actually british culture.

 

We could for example speak about inventions with the tar road, the pneumatic tyre, the steam train, the hypodermic syringe, the telephone all coming from scotland alone.

British culture IS multicultural. So lets have more of it. Lets ship in some eskimos.

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Multiculturalism and artificial mass immigration are so unnatural that one needs a constant brainwashing mantra-propaganda pumped into them that it is good. As a boat that is sinking needs constant pumping to get the water out.
Countries aren't post code areas, or market squares, or factories. Countries are a delicate fabric of cultures and ethnicities build over thousands of years. To grow up in ones culture, among their brothers and sisters, to their language, their legends is what produces happiness in my humble opinion. Not having cheaper janitors or getting plastic gadgets cheaper.
England`s culture has slowly evolved out of a core Briton ethnic background a small amount of Celtic, Roman, Anglosaxon and Scandinavian migration over more than 2500 years (as gene studies prove). To destroy that delicate fabric in 20 years bringing artificially hordes of strangers into a land is evil and destructive.

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9 hours ago, Crom said:

British culture IS multicultural. So lets have more of it. Lets ship in some eskimos.

 

what if that removed eskimos from their connection to place and made them into rootless people with no sense of meaning or purpose in their life?

 

what if those eskimos did not feel suited to life in britain and instead became insular and bogged down in neo-marxist housing estates where they fell back on drugs and crime to cope with their sense of displacement?

Edited by muir

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On 9/19/2019 at 8:42 PM, muir said:

 

what if that removed eskimos from their connection to place and made them into rootless people with no sense of meaning or purpose in their life?

 

what if those eskimos did not feel suited to life in britain and instead became insular and bogged down in neo-marxist housing estates where they fell back on drugs and crime to cope with their sense of displacement?

If you want to be everything you need to do everything. Good and bad. It's all gravy.

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On 9/19/2019 at 11:14 AM, Crom said:

British culture IS multicultural. So lets have more of it. Lets ship in some eskimos.

 

47 minutes ago, Crom said:

If you want to be everything you need to do everything. Good and bad. It's all gravy.

 

47 minutes ago, Crom said:

If you want to be everything you need to do everything. Good and bad. It's all gravy.

 

What if the inuit did not want to be shipped and or redistributed to where-ever,

 

You do realize that culture is humanity is the gravy train don't you?

 

It is culture that brings diversity and product which any self reliant system thrives upon if left to develope on its own terms.

Edited by The Apprentice

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