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eliteincontrol

York to ban private cars from city centre within three years

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The medieval city of York has announced plans to ban private cars from the city centre within three years in a bid to cut carbon emissions.

 

Councillors spelled out the “unashamedly ambitious” goal that would follow the lead of Bristol, which is due to become the first UK city to ban diesel cars by 2021.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/york-to-ban-private-cars-from-city-centre-within-three-years/ar-BBYuvm4?ocid=spartandhp

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and at the same time the councillors will proclaim support for the high street shops

but then cry foul when the tax revenue dries up

 

its not the councillors deciding this crap. its those that write policy and who formulate repayment structures for government bonds

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2 hours ago, zArk said:

and at the same time the councillors will proclaim support for the high street shops

The high street shops are still suffering due to online retailers where more shops could still be closed down for good over the next decade yet.

You just wonder how many more cities in the UK will follow suit and decide to ban private cars? I work in a city centre currently and friends/relatives keep on advising me I'm better commuting on the local bus route into the city rather than drive my car in, especially as I mostly do 9 to 5 weekdays, because it can be so mental on the roads commuting in and out of the city.

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On 12/31/2019 at 4:55 PM, zArk said:

and at the same time the councillors will proclaim support for the high street shops

but then cry foul when the tax revenue dries up

 

its not the councillors deciding this crap. its those that write policy and who formulate repayment structures for government bonds

 

Yeahh--- nice to reduce traffic jams and all that but the buses will be packed- what they gonna do about that? They'll have to put on more buses won't they?

I dislike bus travel myself- stuffy, smelly and noisy. I cycle as much as I can ( weather/distance/what I can carry back from shops allows).

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On 12/31/2019 at 7:09 PM, eliteincontrol said:

The high street shops are still suffering due to online retailers where more shops could still be closed down for good over the next decade yet.

You just wonder how many more cities in the UK will follow suit and decide to ban private cars? I work in a city centre currently and friends/relatives keep on advising me I'm better commuting on the local bus route into the city rather than drive my car in, especially as I mostly do 9 to 5 weekdays, because it can be so mental on the roads commuting in and out of the city.

 

I know people that can drive and have cars but often get the bus into town because they said the parking fees are twice as much as the bus fare!

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Posted (edited)

Thinking on this is probably the slow roll out to banning private car ownership and the move towards those robo electric smart cars they want in the next 30 years ( where you'd order one by debit card on a smart phone app). 

 

It wouldn't much affect me either way because I could be dead by the time it happens ( I'm 51) and I can't drive any way: I'm a cyclist.

 

But I can see it'd be a problem for those living in very rural areas and those who have to drive a lot to get to jobs like freelancers and home carers to the elderly.

Edited by itsnotallrightjack

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York has been operating a park and ride scheme for around 30 years now and it's Medieval walls and riverside location causes all sorts of traffic congestion problems at peak times especially in the Summer.


Expensive place to live these days but always worth a visit the recently acquired fleet of electric buses will be thoroughly tested over the next three years.


http://www.optare.com/news/2019/4/1/york-to-boast-one-of-the-biggest-fleets-of-double-deck-electric-buses-outside-of-london

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I recently drove to York for the Christmas market and took the park and ride in.

 

Although I dislike bus travel in winter in general, mainly due to the unhygienic aspects of people coughing and sneezing etc, it was far less stressful than having to find a parking space and was cheaper than parking in York centre.

 

I'm not against such schemes as it will help congestion, but it might only serve to increase congestion as they will have to put more buses on to ferry people in and out, which is counter productive.

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21 hours ago, itsnotallrightjack said:

Thinking on this is probably the slow roll out to banning private car ownership and the move towards those robo electric smart cars they want in the next 30 years ( where you'd order one by debit card on a smart phone app).

 

yes they intend to end all private ownership

 

you won't be able to own your smart apartment or smart car. You will live by-your-leave of the STATE (a technocratic state run by the elites who will wield power of life or death over the dissempowered populace)

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15 hours ago, serpentine said:

York has been operating a park and ride scheme for around 30 years now and it's Medieval walls and riverside location causes all sorts of traffic congestion problems at peak times especially in the Summer.


Expensive place to live these days but always worth a visit the recently acquired fleet of electric buses will be thoroughly tested over the next three years.


http://www.optare.com/news/2019/4/1/york-to-boast-one-of-the-biggest-fleets-of-double-deck-electric-buses-outside-of-london

 

Already got some electric buses where I live. The bus drivers don't like them though- they said they take ages to power up in the morning and often break down.

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4 hours ago, itsnotallrightjack said:

 

Already got some electric buses where I live. The bus drivers don't like them though- they said they take ages to power up in the morning and often break down.

 

York is low lying and the nexus of A road conjunctions with very few elevations above 100 feet which is in the favour of the buses which will improve with each iteration. Notice the outer ring road around the city where some of the park and ride car parks  can be found.

 

https://en-gb.topographic-map.com/maps/jia/York/

 

Some of them are double deckers with room for 99 passengers so are a step up on the recent vehicles tested in Canberra.

 

https://the-riotact.com/electric-buses-missed-35-per-cent-of-their-peak-services-during-canberra-trial/327356

 

Not continually having  to operate in heavy vehicle traffic within the inner city if the car ban goes through might help with long term reliabilty.

 

 

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1 hour ago, serpentine said:

Not continually having  to operate in heavy vehicle traffic within the inner city if the car ban goes through might help with long term reliabilty.

the heavy traffic is created and perpetuated in large part by traffic light systems that are designed to stack em and rack em

 

a journalist asked an MP a question years ago and the MP inadvertently told him

all road traffic improvements are costed including 'fuel tax revenue loss'

 

so if a new traffic system knocks 10mins off rush hour journey with less stop starts that equals $1 less fuel each day by each car

this loss to tax revenue is costed in to the job

hence any traffic system that clears traffic quicker and efficiently is too expensive

 

its all created by design in the most clever way

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On 1/3/2020 at 12:54 AM, itsnotallrightjack said:

I know people that can drive and have cars but often get the bus into town because they said the parking fees are twice as much as the bus fare!

Yes this is what is happening in my local city centres right now in regards to the parking fees in car parks. The local bus route works out only slightly less than the cheapest car park in the city which always gets rammed full because it's the cheapest. However as I commute to do my 9 - 5 job weekdays, I'm hardly using the car much at home infact just locally as I'm single with hardly any dependants and do my shop at the main store 2 minutes around corner from my house, and work out at the local gym next door to it, also my doctor/dentist surgery is around the corner from those so just use it locally. I went out to my car on the driveway before Christmas, to warm it up after a frozen few days, and it stuttered upon starting up as it's hardly used by me at present. But I intend to keep it as I've got a potential new partner that lives 5 to 7 miles away from me so I think it is best for me to use it for social pleasures if not commuting.

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15 hours ago, eliteincontrol said:

Yes this is what is happening in my local city centres right now in regards to the parking fees in car parks. The local bus route works out only slightly less than the cheapest car park in the city which always gets rammed full because it's the cheapest. However as I commute to do my 9 - 5 job weekdays, I'm hardly using the car much at home infact just locally as I'm single with hardly any dependants and do my shop at the main store 2 minutes around corner from my house, and work out at the local gym next door to it, also my doctor/dentist surgery is around the corner from those so just use it locally. I went out to my car on the driveway before Christmas, to warm it up after a frozen few days, and it stuttered upon starting up as it's hardly used by me at present. But I intend to keep it as I've got a potential new partner that lives 5 to 7 miles away from me so I think it is best for me to use it for social pleasures if not commuting.

 

Yes, all makes sense re your care usage. Drivers I know are kinda doing that too. Some do shop using the car though as they can load up a car with groceries instead of doing lots of small trips lugging shopping bags. For non drivers like me I have to do them on foot with a shopping trolley or small shops on my bike ( rucksack and bags on the handlebars until i get a rear basket attached).

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9 minutes ago, itsnotallrightjack said:

Yes, all makes sense re your care usage. Drivers I know are kinda doing that too.

I primarily, at minute, use it locally as I live in a cul-de-sac on my estate and I am very lucky to have the shops I need to go to within my estate so it is like a regular local round trip in it to the shops and back home. I've been advised to contact my local garage and perhaps get the car checked over due to hardly any usage since end of May as I've seen bits of rust especially near the brake discs as per safety fears, where someone has asked me if it brakes OK to come to a stop and I said to them that the brakes still work last time I tried it yesterday.

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A car-free future? How UK cities are moving towards a pedestrian age

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/car-free-cities-pedestrianisation-cycling-driverless-vehicles-york-oslo-birmingham-a9299856.html

With York announcing plans to ban private vehicles from its centre, is it a blueprint for a better urban life?

Rush hour, York city centre, sometime around the end of the decade. Stress-free commuters glide by on bicycles, community gardens are tended by volunteers as they leave work, and early evening diners spill outside on to table-filled squares.

Over in Fossgate, a mid-week street festival is just beginning. At the station, a line of on-demand driverless pods whisk arriving rail passengers to their end destinations.

Such is what this North Yorkshire city could look like if proposals approved by the council to make the centre car free by 2023 come to fruition. Or so say advocates.

Others, including the chamber of commerce, are not entirely convinced. There are concerns that less vehicles could ultimately mean reduced footfall leading to a nosediving economy, struggling businesses and plummeting job opportunities.

It is, in many ways, says one councillor, a fight for the heart and future of the city.

Yet this is not a battle which will be confined to York over the next decade.

As more calls are made for the country to reduce carbon emissions and congestion amid the ongoing climate crisis, the debate over the large-scale pedestrianisation of our urban centres is set to become one of the defining arguments of the 2020s.

Already, Birmingham has announced an aspiration to stop private vehicles driving through its centre; Sheffield, Leeds and Edinburgh have experimented with (albeit limited) car-free days; and Bristol is to ban diesel vehicles next year. Already, too, opponents in all those places have voiced misgivings.

All of which perhaps raises two questions.

Can the UK city – an environment that has been designed almost entirely around the automobile for close to a century – really pivot to pedestrians and public transport? And what would car-free cities here look like anyway?

A sprawling car park outside a sprawling shopping centre on the outskirts of Bristol is probably not the obvious place to find the answer to either of those questions.

But at the Mall at Cribbs Causeway this week a team of developers, software engineers and transport academics were here hoping to offer a small glimpse into the future.

They were road-testing a £5.6m driverless pod – the sort of electric sci-fi buggy some strategists hope could one day zip people around car-less city centres.

But, as is the way of these things, not everything ran smoothly.

After more than two years state-of-the-art development – radar, lidar and vision processing are all key – the buggy, called Capri, kept being rendered immobile by the, er, sun.

The onboard sensors repeatedly mistook the morning glare for an object in the vehicle’s path, causing it to repeatedly brake.

“Teething issue,” noted George Lunt, technical director at Aecom, the infrastructure company leading the public-private project. “Better it stops when it shouldn’t, than it keeps going when it should stop.”

Such hiccups aside – and, by the end of the week, it appeared resolved – the government is seemingly committed to such driverless technology.
 It has invested an estimated £250m in similar research projects since 2015 and has said it would like autonomous vehicles appearing on roads by next year. Indeed, if current tests in Scotland run smoothly, transport company Stagecoach says the UK’s first driverless bus could be scheduled between Edinburgh and Fife in early 2021. Albeit, a driver would actually remain on board at all times.

“It’s ambitious,” says Lunt as the Capri tootles about like something from Mos Eisley, the fictional spaceport town in Star Wars. “But there are so many benefits in terms of reduced environment impact, economic development and improving road safety. It would revolutionise the way we move around.”

Nonetheless, here in this car park such a future feels an awfully long way off. Technological issues, public scepticism about safety and the sheer cost of development could all prove significant roadblocks before such pods are seen in our cities.
 In the meantime, many strategists argue, there is a rather cheaper, older bit of kit which, in fact, should be the focus when it comes to transforming how we travel: the bicycle.

The Netherlands may today be the bike capital of the world but it was not inevitable it would be so.

In the Sixties, the place was as in thrall to the automobile as the rest of the western world. Entire neighbourhoods in cities like Amsterdam and Eindhoven were bulldozed for highways.
 But, partially motivated by sky-rocketing motoring deaths – including 400 children in 1971 alone – a political decision was made that would transform the country: here, almost uniquely in Europe, cyclists would be prioritised over cars.

Money was pumped into creating bike-friendly paths, nation-wide car free days were held (photos show children playing on deserted motorways), and schools ordered to give mandatory safety lessons.

As early as the mid-Seventies, the northern city of Groningen was already turning virtually car free. There, a 24-year-old councillor, Max van den Berg, had been placed in charge of urban planning, and used his portfolio to push through measures redirecting cars around – rather than into – the historic centre. Roads were blocked off – initially with rubble – and dedicated cycle lanes laid out around restored buildings. Four local politicians resigned over the scheme and the city’s chamber of commerce petitioned the Dutch queen to stop it.
 Yet almost 50 years on, Groningen is widely considered one of the most liveable cities in a country full of them. The chamber of commerce now credits the pedestrianised streets – and the sociability they encourage – with allowing independent business to thrive.

“But the point is that there is no special low countries gene which makes people there more inclined to cycling,” says Dr Steve Melia, a senior academic with the Centre for Transport and Society at the University of the West of England, in Bristol. “Cycling is prioritised there because a decision was made in the Sixties. There is absolutely no reason that same decision can’t be made here.”

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