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Moonlight

Ethiopia-The Ark of the Covenant ​​​​​​​👑

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the Ethiopians claim that the  Ark of the Covenant is in their country
they also claim that the Queen of Sheba was from Ethiopian origin and had a child from King Solomon - this child founded their Royal bloodline

 

:classic_smile:

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Heaven always has told me I am part Ethiopian and that's were my most royal side comes from. From a genetic standpoint that is. lol 

 

Which is interesting. 

 

I just never investigated it further then the psychic message. 

 

Ethiopia was off the slave trade, I have a slave owners last name, so I thought it was different to say the least. My grandmother was an Ethiopian shade which my mixed shade grandfather needed someone that would breed more normal shade babies b/c back then, you couldn't get any lighter then him in that southern community. It was opposite back then I guess. lol

 

Those Native American and Ethiopian genes are the most "royal". From the Divine perspective. 

Edited by MatchaLove
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ohh..I think Ethiopian people are a bit crazy :classic_wink: but they are all very religious
they also mean they are not black people
 

:classic_smile:

 

 

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One of the first of the legendary Grandmasters of Freemasonry was King Solomon, from whom Haile Selassie claimed direct descent.

 

Haile Selassie and Marcus Garvey were both Freemasons and it is no surprise that Freemasonry has been an influence on Rastafarianism.

 

Freemasonry has also strongly influenced Haitian Vodou.

 

Quote

Caliban and the Widow’s Sons: Some Aspects of the Intersections and Interactions between Freemasonry and Afro-Caribbean Religious Praxis

Friday, January 8, 2016: 11:10 AM
Room 311/312 (Hilton Atlanta)
Eoghan Craig Ballard, Roosevelt Center for Civic Society and Freemasonry
 
After Freemasonry spread across Europe in the 18th century, it was inevitable that its influence should reach the Caribbean. Masonic lodges were founded in France's colony of Saint Domingue as early as 1738. It was not long before men of African descent entered the fraternity. Some of these men went on to hold leadership positions in the Haitian Revolution. It was inevitable, given the wide distribution of African inspired religious practice in the Caribbean, that Freemasonry would interact with African religions. Elements of Masonic symbolism reflect back from the graphic systems employed in Haitian Vodou and Afro-Cuban Palo, a religion of Congo origin. Hand gestures and ritual movements in the Asson tradition of Haitian Vodou have been credited with Masonic influence, and significant elements clearly identifiable as being of Masonic origin, comprise parts of the intiation rituals of Quimbisa, a religion of Central African origin in Cuba. Such exchanges do not reflect a single direction. Recently a Grand Commander General was appointed to the Scottish Rite for Cuba, who is a practicing member of the Abakuá, a tradition originating in the Cross River area of Nigeria, and also one of the founding Babalawo's of Cuba's internationally recognized Yoruba annual divination committee, which is viewed as religious guidance on three continents. In Haiti, a Masonic Rite was founded which invokes certain Lwa or spirits of Haitian Vodou, which are recognized throughout the international community of Vodou religious praxis as Masonic spirits. One of Vodou's most iconographic spirits, Baron Samedi, the Lord over the dead, unmistakably combines Masonic regalia with the iconic skull used in the initiatic Chamber of Reflection. Even in Brazil, the temples of Umbanda, a modern Afro-Brazilian faith, are replete with Masonic elements, and it is not uncommon for freemasons in Brazil to also be initiates in Umbanda.

 

 

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